It is involved in cultural promotion of the region and its naturalistic, architectonic, …

Located in northeastern Italy, to the east of Lake Garda , the Valpolicella scenic vineyards, start in the fertile plain and climb up to the hills, north of Verona, offering a magnificent view over the town.This is an area full of history, culture and some of the best Italian wine. Valpantena. The Valpolicella wine zone, in northeastern Italy’s Veneto region, produces some of Italy’s best-known red wines, using Corvina, Rondinella and Molinara grapes.. Red wines labeled as "Valpolicella" are typically made from the Corvina Veronese (40-70%), Rondinella (20-40%) and Molinara (5-20%) grape varieties. Wines made here are softer and fresher and tend to keep their flavour for longer.

Corvina is the darling grape of the Valpo blend and known for its flavors of cherries and chocolate. Region: Veneto History: Established as a DOC in 1968; subtypes Recioto della Valpolicella and Amarone della Valpolicella became DOCGs and Valpolicella Ripasso a separate DOC in 2010 Vineyard Area: 7,844 ha / 19,400 acres (2017) total for all four Valpolicella DOPs Production: 140,940 hl / 1,566,000 cases (2018) Principal Red Grape Varieties: Corvina, Corvinone The region's most famous wine, Amarone della Valpolicella, partially dries grapes to increase concentration in a process called appasimento. The wines produced here are warm and full of character. 4.2. VALPOLICELLA . Rarer still, all four wines are produced throughout the region.

$34.49. Valpolicella is a well-known wine-producing region in the province of Verona, between the foothills of the Alps and Lake Garda (Lago di Garda) in the northern Italian Veneto region. Valpolicella Classico. Wines bearing the Valpolicella DOC label are fresh and cherry-scented, with a slight hint of bitterness on the finish. Amarone della Valpolicella is the most prestigious wine from the Valpolicella region in Veneto Italy. The Valpolicella region to the north of Verona specializes in various red wines with a unique production method, while the Soave region to the east produces some lovely white wines.

Amarone della Valpolicella, usually known as Amarone (UK: / ˌ æ m ə ˈ r oʊ n eɪ,-n i /, Italian: [amaˈroːne]), is an Italian DOCG denomination of typically rich dry red wine made from the partially dried grapes of the Corvina (45–95%, of which up to 50% could be substituted with Corvinone), Rondinella (5–30%) and other approved red grape varieties (up to 25%). Description. The reason Amarone is important these days is because it earned DOCG status in 2009; Italy’s official top-tier wine classification. By law Valpolicella DOC wines must be made using 45-95% Corvina. Amarone: King of Valpolicella wine! Amarone della Valpolicella is the most prestigious wine from the Valpolicella region in Veneto Italy. 4.2. Most consider the Italian wine regions of Piedmont and Tuscany to be … Amarone: King of Valpolicella wine! Top rated wines from Valpolicella. Description. Veneto. Valpolicella Ripasso wines are deeply colored, rich, densely jammy wines that are lip-smacking good. The vineyards of the Valpolicella Classico region are northeast of Verona, in the Veneto, spread out amidst a series of three pre-alpine valleys abutting the Lessini Mountains—the Fumane, Marano, and Negrare valleys.. Valpolicella’s red wines were, in fact, popular in Roman times, when the sweet Recioto (sweeter due to the fermentation being halted before that of the Amarone wines, leaving residual sugar) wine was in vogue. Red wines labeled as "Valpolicella" are typically made from the Corvina Veronese (40-70%), Rondinella (20-40%) and Molinara (5-20%) grape varieties.

The reason Amarone is important these days is because it earned DOCG status in 2009; Italy’s official top-tier wine classification.

Similar to Valpolicella Classico in style, but fruitier and with more herbaceous hints.

Learn about the various Valpolicella Superiore Ripasso wine regions with Wine Enthusiast Magazine's easy to use Valpolicella Superiore Ripasso wine guide. Valpolicella is a well-known wine-producing region in the province of Verona, between the foothills of the Alps and Lake Garda (Lago di Garda) in the northern Italian Veneto region. The Valpolicella wine zone, in northeastern Italy’s Veneto region, produces some of Italy’s best-known red wines, using Corvina, Rondinella and Molinara grapes..

Wines bearing the Valpolicella DOC label are fresh and cherry-scented, with a slight hint of bitterness on the finish. Valpolicella’s traditional wine-growing region. Eastern Valpolicella. Valpolicella is a DOC named for the valley in the Veneto region of Italy, meaning “valley of many cellars.” The blend of grapes that comprise Valpolicella (and its prized dried grape form, Amarone) are Corvina, Molinara and Rondinella, sometimes with some small percentage of Barbera, Negrara Trentina, Rossignola and/or Sangiovese. Located in northeastern Italy, to the east of Lake Garda , the Valpolicella scenic vineyards, start in the fertile plain and climb up to the hills, north of Verona, offering a magnificent view over the town.This is an area full of history, culture and some of the best Italian wine.