But this is a bit more complicated than the… The beech scale insect wounds the tree by piercing the bark with sharp mouth parts and sucking out the sap. Disease-free beech trees have been observed in infested stands throughout the range of beech bark disease (BBD). Beech Bark Disease. Beech bark disease (BBD) is caused by both a sap-feeding scale insect and a fungus. Beech Bark Disease is caused by a scale insect and fungus complex that attacks the American Beech (Fagus grandifolia). Advanced primarily by wind, BBD has moved from east to west through the national lakeshore. The fungus kills the wood by blocking the flow of sap. and Xylococculus betulae Perg.) Note the clusters of red perithecia, each about 0.25 mm in diameter. and fungal (Neonectria faginata [Lohman, Watson & Ayres] Castl. Beech Bark Disease results from the combined actions of the Woolly Beech Scale (Cryptococcus fagisuga), a non-native sap-feeding scale insect and certain types of fungi, mainly Neonectria faginata 1.The disease arrived around 1890 in Nova Scotia on an imported European Beech, and by the 1930s it was causing significant beech mortality across the Maritime Provinces 2. As large areas of bark are affected, the tree is girdled and killed. Infestation is easily identified by the white woolly material on trunks, secreted by the female scale insect (Fig. Detected in the mid-20th-century in New York State, if your landscape includes American beech trees this is a disease you should understand. Cryptococcus fagisuga, commonly known as the beech scale or woolly beech scale, is a felted scale insect in the superfamily Coccoidea that infests beech trees of the genus Fagus.It is associated with the transmission of beech bark disease because the puncture holes it makes in the bark allow entry of pathogenic fungi which have been identified as Nectria coccinea var. Beech bark disease disease is caused by a pathogen that does not attack trees until they have been extensively infested with a non-native scale insect. Beech bark disease definition is - a disease of beech especially destructive in eastern Canada and northern U.S. that is due to the combined activities of the beech scale (Cryptococcus fagi) and a fungus (Nectria coccinea faginata) and causes destruction of living bark, wilting of … Beech Scale Beech scales are yellow, soft-bodied insects that are 0.5 to 1.0 mm long as adults. Beech bark disease is the result of a complex interaction between three non-native pests (a tiny scale insect and two species of Nectria fungus) and a native Nectria fungus. Disease Symptoms Pathogen/Cause Management; Bark disease: Circular to horizontal elliptic cankers form on the bark. Neonectria sp. The disease is caused by the fungus Nectria coccinea, which is carried on the bodies of beech scale, a small, sucking insect. If you see a beech tree at least 20-30 cm (8-12 inches) in diameter that appears healthy and free of beech scale, while trees around are dead and dying of the disease, it may be a resistant tree. Fissures in bark caused by beech scale (Cryptococcus fagisuga), frost or hail injuries, or human and animal interference allow Nectria spores to invade the cambium. Beech Bark Disease (BBD) complex consists of two organisms, a scale insect and a fungal pathogen, which together create entry wounds and infection that kill beech trees.

Beech scale and beech bark disease were discovered in Michigan in 2000.

Beech bark disease causes significant amounts of beech trees to die each year, according to David R. Houston and James T. O'Brien, plant pathologists with the United States Department of Agriculture.

Beech-bark disease is the umbrella term for damage to beech trees caused by infestation of fungi in the Necria family, primarily N. coccineaand N. galligena. This is another introduced disease.

Scale feeding allows infection by the Neonectria fungus. A species profile for Beech bark disease (BBD).

Cryptococcus fagisuga, commonly known as the beech scale or woolly beech scale, is a felted scale insect in the superfamily Coccoidea that infests beech trees of the genus Fagus.It is associated with the transmission of beech bark disease because the puncture holes it makes in the bark allow entry of pathogenic fungi which have been identified as Nectria coccinea var. 2). The scale feeds on the superficial layer of the beech bark, creating a vulnerable spot that allows for infection to occur by the Nectria fungus.

The scale insect feeds on the beech tree sap, opening wounds in the tree for the fungus to start colonizing the bark, cambium layer, and sapwood of the tree (OFAH/OMNR Invading Species Awareness Program, 2012). As detection efforts continue, other infested areas will likely be found. Specifically, at least two different species of nectria fungus (accidentally introduced to the U.S. via European nursery stock in the late 1800s) is introduced into susceptible beech trees via the beech scale, a tiny sap-feeding insect that pierces the thin bark of the tree. American beech trees are first infested with beech scale.